Teacher Resources: Phrasal Verb Videos

phrasal verbs
Phrasal Verb image from My English Pages

It has been a cold start to the year in the UK, especially here in the South East. A few weeks ago, we had snow on two separate occasions – which was a pleasant surprise. Anyhow, I thought I would write a new blog post with some videos that were shared with me and what I think would benefit the English language classroom.

These short videos are both comical and have a phrasal verb focus. For example, the first part of the phrasal verb video, by Phrasal Verbs Friends, looks at the different meanings of the word “take out”. The second video in this series looks at the different meanings of “get over”, while the final video looks at the meanings of “set up”. All phrasal verbs placed into a context and situation within a dialogue and then the meanings are given within the videos themselves.

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Top Ten Lesson Ideas for QR Codes

Notes that I kept from my previous blog post on QR Codes
Notes from 2 years ago with my original blog post about QR Codes. Glad I kept them.

I wrote this post two years ago but unfortunately it was removed without me knowing. I am assuming it was related to my transfer from WordPress.com to WordPress.org. However, I thought I would rewrite this popular blog post and offer English teachers some ideas about how to incorporate QR Codes into lessons.

If you are unsure what a QR Code is, don’t worry. A QR Code, also known as a Quick Response Code, is essentially a two dimensional barcode which can be used by mobile devices (such as smartphones or tablets) to link to websites, embed text within them or even include MP3 files within the QR Code itself. However, you may be asking how to create a code. Not to worry, I have a tutorial below to help. Read more

Top Ten Tips for Teaching English to Primary Learners

A few weeks ago, I was honoured to teach a group of Chinese primary learners (aged between 4 and 8 years of age) for the first time in a long time. The last time that I had taught primary-aged English language learners was in my initial few years of teaching in South Korea. However, it was a rewarding and highly motivating group of learners to teach. Fortunately, I had a chance to reflect much of my knowledge and awareness of primary learners from a Young Learner Extension Certificate which I undertook a number of years ago. With much reflection and consideration, I have now thought of my top ten tips for teaching primary learners.

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Top Five Tips to Start Online ESL Teaching

Online English teaching is becoming more and more popular with many students and teachers communicating and learning through the medium of technology. It is now a growing business with many teachers opting to teach online. I have been teaching English for over a year now with one organisation and usually teach at the weekend. It is different to teaching in the classroom and there is greater flexibility for teachers as well as students. If you want to consider a career teaching English to students then there are some great opportunities available. In this blog post, Daniel offers readers five important tips to consider when starting your online ESL teacher career.

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Top 10 Tips for Teaching in South Korea

Our last blog contribution was from Kim Ooi about teaching in China, but in this blog post we are now looking at teaching in South Korea. Jackie Bolen has taught English in South Korea and she is offering 10 top tips for surviving as a teacher in this country. She offers advice with regards to understanding the culture more and also provides some invaluable insights to living and working in this wonderful country. So, if you are considering teaching in South Korea, look no further and read more about it here.

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How To Survive as an English Teacher in China by Kim Ooi

Teaching in China is becoming more and more of a popular destination for teachers of English who are keen to earn a decent salary and developing their career in English language teaching. Looking at recent job posts on this website, the majority of the job submissions are from China. So, what is the best way to survive as an English teacher in China? In this blog contribution, Kim Ooi attempts to answer this question.

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Classroom Community Builders: Book Review

Introduction

I was kindly asked a few weeks ago by Alphabet Publishing to review a recent publication, “Classroom Community Builders: Activities for the First Day & Beyond“, written by Walton Burns. After a few weeks of waiting, the book finally arrived along with a personalised letter from the publisher.

The publisher, Alphabet Publishing, is one of those small independent organisations which specialise with practical ideas for teaching and lesson ideas. The first book that I reviewed for them was “50 Activities for the First Day of School” as a video book review. You can watch the video below or find out a bit more from a previous blog post.

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Twenty Ideas to Make Your Lessons More Exciting

A teacher training session looked at 20 ways to make your lessons more exciting and engaging. Please find below a video of the training session, the PowerPoint slides as well as a Handout which was provided to each of the attendees.

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“Interaction Online”: Book Review

“Interaction Online: Creative activities for blended learning”

I was excited to receive one of the latest publications from Cambridge University Press, Interaction Online. The book is co-authored by Lindsay Clandfield, who has written other titles including the successful Global coursebook series, as well as Jill Hadfield, who has written the recognisable photocopiable resources: Communication Games. As with other Cambridge Handbooks for Language Teachers series, this latest publication is edited by Scott Thornbury.

Interaction Online” is aimed for teachers who are keen to incorporate an aspect of online interaction as part of their course. It also encourages use with not just face-to-face courses but also with online or blended learning courses. As you read further into the Introduction of the book, the authors focus on interaction and tools to promote online interaction. These suggested tools include message or chat services such as WeChat or WhatsApp, audio or video tools such as FaceTime or Skype as well as discussion forums or message boards. The Introduction is logically organised and well paced with suitable information for any reader who is keen to implement an element of online interaction with their course. The final section of the Introduction provides a comprehensive breakdown of suggested interactive online activities in their corresponding chapters: ‘Personal interaction‘ (Chapter 2), ‘Factual interaction‘ (Chapter 3), ‘Creative interaction‘ (Chapter 4), ‘Critical interaction‘ (Chapter 5) and ‘Fanciful interaction‘ (Chapter 6).

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Why No Asian Face?

No Asian Face

You would think in this day and age with technology, the internet and people travelling around the world more than ever before that people would be more exposed to those from a range of different backgrounds, colours and creeds. Unfortunately, from a recent job advertisement on Ajarn Recruit, it is not the case. There is currently a job advert seeking an English teacher, but their main require: “no Asian face“!

We want you to be part of our teaching TEAM. We treat all team members with care and respect and want this to be a rewarding experience for all who join us, even if only for a year.

It is appalling that the recruitment website hasn’t taken the advert down and that the organisation seeking a teacher, which prides itself on treating¬†“all team members with care and respect“, is willing to assess an applicant based upon their ethnicity rather than their suitability or experience to do the job.

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